Millennials & Golf’s Value Proposition

GGA Partners and Nextgengolf Release Findings from Annual Research Study on Millennial Golf Community

Over 1,600 millennial golfers share habits, attitudes, and preferences about golf

TORONTO (June 10, 2020) – In an ongoing research collaboration, Nextgengolf and GGA Partners have released their annual study on the millennial golf community.

Nextgengolf is a growth-of-the-game subsidiary of the PGA of America.  GGA Partners serves as an international consulting firm and trusted advisor to many of the world’s most successful golf courses, private clubs, resorts, and residential communities. Together, their report suggests ways golf facilities can adapt and develop their offerings to meet the needs of the next generation of members and customers.

“Not every millennial is the same, but it’s often communicated that way,” said Nextgengolf Director of Operations Matt Weinberger. “In our continuous work with the millennial audience and now Generation Z, we see tremendous opportunity for golf facilities to deliver value to young people, while operating their businesses successfully. The key is understanding how golf businesses mesh with millennial lifestyles.”

Featuring valuable insights about millennial golfers, the challenges they face, and opportunities for facilities to help support the long-term sustainability of the game, the research reveals three overarching observations:

1. The lifestyles of millennial golfers have changed the way they approach, experience and enjoy the game of golf.

Leading fast and casual lives, the millennial concept of “golf lifestyle” is evolving to allow for more flexibility, greater efficiency, a unification of multiple social activities into a single experience, and experimentation with the way the next wave of customers and members engage with the game.

2. Socialization and relationships are important for millennial recruitment and retention.

Millennials typically start playing golf as a result of encouragement from a family member. They primarily continue to play because of their own friendships, using golf as a platform for shared activity and a chance to connect. Family is a huge factor for millennials and will increase in significance, especially as it relates to private club membership.

3. Cost is a major concern for millennials and the biggest barrier for them to play golf.

This is partially due to lifestyle evolution and primarily as a result of funding capability.  The good news is that millennials show strong interest to join private clubs under the “right” fee structure – traditional club membership offerings and conventional fee structures are less appealing to millennials than previous generations.

“When it comes to private club membership, costs continue to be barriers for millennials but there’s a bigger picture at play,” observed GGA Partner Michael Gregory. “While price is important, the best performing clubs are focused on creating an experience that enhances millennials’ lifestyles and develops a sense of emotional connection and belonging.  An experience that also enhances the lifestyles of their family strengthens this connection, elevates the value proposition, and paves the way for greater price elasticity.”

Focused exclusively on an audience of active, avid millennial golfers with prior golf interest and experience in tournaments or golf events, the 2020 study brings forward survey findings from more than 1,650 millennial golfers and builds upon research annually conducted since 2017. To date, more than 5,200 survey responses have been analyzed during the four-year research study.

Details on these findings and more are illustrated throughout the full report, titled “Millennials & Golf’s Value Proposition” and available on the GGA Partners and PGA of America websites.

Click here to see the findings and download the report

 

About GGA Partners

GGA Partners™ is an international consulting firm and trusted advisor to many of the world’s most successful golf courses, private clubs, resorts, and residential communities. We are dedicated to helping owners, asset managers, club and community leaders, investors and real estate developers tackle challenges, achieve objectives, and maximize asset performance.

Established in 1992 as the KPMG Golf Industry Practice, our global team of experienced professionals leverage in-depth business intelligence and proprietary global data to deliver impactful strategic solutions and lasting success. For more information, visit ggapartners.com.

About Nextgengolf

Nextgengolf is an inclusive organization with the mission to provide golfing opportunities, keep golfers in the game, and make the game of golf more relevant for high school students, college students, and young adults. Through our NHSGA, NCCGA and City Tour products, we cater to golfers 15-40 years old by proactively keeping golfers engaged through events and bringing new players into the game. In 2019, Nextgengolf was acquired by the PGA of America. For more information, visit nextgengolf.org.

About PGA of America

The PGA of America is one of the world’s largest sports organizations, with nearly 29,000 professionals who daily work to grow interest and participation in the game of golf. For more information about the PGA of America, visit PGA.org, follow @PGAofAmerica on Twitter and find us on Facebook.

 

Contact

Michael Gregory
GGA Partners
416-524-0083
michael.gregory@ggapartners.com

Michael Abramowitz
PGA of America
561-389-4647
mabramowitz@pgahq.com

Spread the Goodness of Golf

Hardy Greaves, the boy who learned about life through golf in the 2000 movie The Legend of Bagger Vance, had an early appreciation for the game.

“You really love this game, don’t you,” local golfing legend Rannulph Junuh (Matt Damon) asks Hardy.

“It’s the greatest game there is,” Hardy (J. Michael Moncrief) shoots back.

“You really think so?”

“Ask anybody. It’s fun. It’s hard and you stand out there on that green, green grass, and it’s just you and the ball and there ain’t nobody to beat up on but yourself,” Hardy says, adding for proof the example of a club member whose incurable golf swing has broken his toe three times, but who keeps coming back for more. “It’s the only game I know that you can call a penalty on yourself, if you’re honest, which most people are. There just ain’t no other game like it.”

Tens of millions of golfers have a similar love affair with a simple game. But not enough of us take the time to say so and explain to others why we feel as we do, how golf teaches valuable lessons, and why it’s important to our local communities and planet. And that’s a shame because the game and business to which so many devote so much of their time needs our voices and our support.

Beyond the dedicated work being performed by superintendents, golf professionals and managers, and beyond the enthusiastic embrace of the more than 24 million Americans, golfers need to remember that golf and golf courses add so much to lives which are great and small, influential and not, privileged and not. Golf courses serve as critically important open spaces and environmentally safe havens. They also provide water retention and flood-control solutions for many communities. And by employing so many people, they bring economic vitality.

Here are three ways to support golf and expand its impact for generations to come:

1. Promote the game and the virtues it brings to life.

Steadfastness. Work ethic. Capability for facing adversity. Jubilation shared with others. The game is a tireless teacher to those who will learn. It is often a superintendent or golf professional who wields the influence that encourages beginners and engages longtime golfers. Their job descriptions should include a role as storyteller, reliving great moments from their time around the game. Talk to your co-workers and staff members and make sure they know historical and environmental characteristics of your course and the wildlife that your golfers might spot during a round.

2. Make your course a learning laboratory.

Conduct field days when you and your staff provide seminars and discussion groups regarding best practices for irrigation, fertility, water consumption and arboreal care. Make your teaching efforts more than “how to repair a ball mark” and let golfers enjoy the wonders of course care and upkeep And don’t limit your time and knowledge to your adult golfers. Invite local youth to learn about the course and the efforts you’re making toward sustainability. Help them understand that the world would be a better place if more people were as diligent as superintendents in matters of pesticide use, water-taking practices and land conservation.

3. Take golf to heart.

Golf is a heartfelt endeavor. Those attracted to it share an uncommon devotion to the game itself. Golf is a healthy game, as well. Fresh air and a practically unmatched opportunity to get steps in for the day, not to mention beautiful landscapes, sunrises and sunsets, along with special moments with friends and family.

Edwin Roald, a member of the European Institute of Golf Course Architects, cites seven important health benefits of golf participation: heart health, brain stimulation, weight loss, stress reduction, increased longevity, low frequency of sport-induced injury, and a good night’s sleep.

The smart millennials at NextGenGolf call out five factors arising from golf participation: good for your body, good for your mind, helps to make new friends and business connections, ability to play the game into old age, and the opportunity to experience and protect nature.

There are so many reasons to make golf more a part of your life and to spread the good word. Young Hardy Greaves sure knew what he was talking about.

This article with authored by Henry DeLozier for Golf Course Industry magazine.  Henry also made his Beyond the Page debut to talk about the goodness — the greatness — of golf in a conversation with Golf Course Industry managing editor Matt LaWell. Listen to the podcast below and visit the GCI website to subscribe to the Beyond the Page podcast.

 

Millennials and the Value Proposition at Your Facility

A First-Look at 2020 Millennial Golf Industry Research Findings

In ongoing research collaboration with Millennial golfer organization Nextgengolf, GGA recently updated its study of the habits, attitudes, and preferences of Millennial golfers.  The 2020 study brings forward survey findings from over 1,600 Millennial golfers and builds upon research conducted in 2017, 2018, and 2019.

A preview of this year’s research findings was unveiled in a presentation delivered at the 2020 PGA Merchandise Show by GGA Partner Henry DeLozier and Director, Nextgengolf Operations, Matt Weinberger.

Titled “Millennials and the Value Proposition at Your Facility”, the session introduced key insights and observations from the latest research and supplemented these findings using personal anecdotes shared by participating Millennial golfers.  The session explored what these findings mean for golf facilities and highlighted several tactics some facilities have implemented to enhance their value proposition to Millennial golfers.

Over the next few weeks, be on the lookout for a full, in-depth report of findings.

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Research Overview

In many clubs today, the long-held expectations and perceptions of existing, ageing members are at odds with the entirely different needs and expectations of a new wave of younger, more casual members.  The challenge for clubs?  To create an environment which not only appeals to the new wave, but where members of all types can coexist.

Research findings highlight how golf clubs can adapt and develop their offerings to meet the needs of the next generation of members and customers.  The goal is to provide valuable insights about Millennial golfers, the challenges they face, and the opportunities for clubs to help support the long-term sustainability of the game and the industry as a whole.

Background

As the leading entity for team-based golf in the United States, Nextgengolf connects Millennials to golf and supports the success of their game while GGA specializes in solution engineering and problem solving for golf-related businesses.  A fusion of GGA’s 28-year history of private club research and Nextgengolf’s connection to young golfers afforded the unique opportunity to study a highly valuable Millennial audience.

The survey sample focused exclusively on a sample audience of active, avid Millennial golfers with prior golf interest and experience in tournaments or golf events.  To date, more than 5,200 survey responses have been analyzed during the four-year research study.

Thank you to the Club Management Association of America (CMAA) for the support that makes this research possible.

2019 Millennial Golf Industry Survey Findings – Part 8

In ongoing research collaboration with Millennial golfer organization Nextgengolf, GGA recently updated its study of the habits, attitudes, and preferences of Millennial golfers.  The 2019 study brings forward survey findings from over 1,400 Millennial golfers and builds upon research conducted in 2017 and 2018.

This is the eighth and final installment of a multi-part series of infographics to feature the latest Millennial golfer feedback. Part 8, below, examines public course golf and the key habits, attributes, and fee tolerances of Millennials who play most of their golf at public facilities. Also included are observations about how this group decides which courses to play, how much they expect to play in the future, and key differences between this group of Millennials and those who play most of their golf at private facilities.

See previous individual installments here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, or view all eight parts here.

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Research Overview

In many clubs today, the long-held expectations and perceptions of existing, ageing members are at odds with the entirely different needs and expectations of a new wave of younger, more casual members.  The challenge for clubs?  To create an environment which not only appeals to the new wave, but where members of all types can coexist.

Research findings highlight how golf clubs can adapt and develop their offerings to meet the needs of the next generation of members and customers.  The goal is to provide valuable insights about Millennial golfers, the challenges they face, and the opportunities for clubs to help support the long-term sustainability of the game and the industry as a whole.

Background

As the leading entity for team-based golf in the United States, Nextgengolf connects Millennials to golf and supports the success of their game while GGA specializes in solution engineering and problem solving for golf-related businesses.  A fusion of GGA’s 27-year history of private club research and Nextgengolf’s connection to young golfers afforded the unique opportunity to study a highly valuable Millennial audience.

The survey sample focused exclusively on a sample audience of active, avid Millennial golfers with prior golf interest and experience in tournaments or golf events.  To date, more than 3,600 survey responses have been analyzed during the three-year research study.

Thank you to the Club Management Association of America (CMAA) for the support that makes this research possible.

The Club for Millennials

On the back of GGA’s largest piece of millennial research to date, Michael Gregory answers your questions, revealing how the findings paint a clear picture of who clubs need to target in order to build the next generation of members and customers.

For 3 years GGA and Nextgengolf have analyzed the behavior and attitudes of golfing millennials. Armed with the findings of this research, GGA have engaged with clubs and resorts on how to connect with this audience. Unfortunately, for many clubs, this generation still proves elusive. However, with the latest round of research now complete, we have the clearest ever picture of the untapped potential of millennials.

Below is a selection of questions that have been posed to me in recent months from managers and board members across North America. The answers may help you dispel millennial myths, consider your club’s actions in appealing to this generation, and, in some small way, future-proof the core of your membership.

What do you know now that you didn’t know before about millennials?

This centers around 3 areas: the trigger point for deciding to join a private club, the influence of family in decision-making, and interest in non-golf amenities.

Trigger point: 72% of millennials move to private club membership as the result of a new job or promotion, making way for more disposable income and leisure dollars.

We already know millennials are a highly cost-conscious group. However, an event relating to their work status which sees them earning more is the most powerful trigger point or motivation for them to decide to join a private club. When does this happen? Last year’s research indicated the ‘sweet spot’ for joining a private club was 33 years of age, and this remains the case.

Family: findings suggest a millennial audience is highly influenced by benefits for the whole family and gaining spousal approval when joining.

Millennials increasingly assess the value of club membership not just in individual terms, but in how their loved ones will benefit too. If club membership becomes a gateway to spending more time with those close to them, this will be key to influencing their decision to join.

Non-golf amenities: interest in non-golf amenities is on the increase, with 76% of respondents stating a desire for fitness pursuits and 71% looking for pool facilities.

This increased desire for non-golfing amenities is significant. More and more, millennials are viewing the value proposition offered by private club membership as a lifestyle choice. They may well have gym or health club memberships elsewhere, but if a private club offers those facilities too along with its numerous other attributes, it is more effectively positioned to win out in the millennial mind.

Do I need to create a millennial membership or reduce the cost of membership to appeal to this group?

2019’s findings reaffirm the issue of cost for millennials. Both dues and initiation fees continue to be barriers, and it is a reality that clubs will need to compete on price to appeal to this group (how much depends on the club’s location and market position).

But there’s also a bigger picture at play. While price is (and likely always will be) important, the best performing clubs are focused on creating an experience that enhances millennials lifestyles and develops a sense of emotional connection and belonging. An experience that also enhances the lifestyles of their family strengthens this connection, elevates the value proposition and paves the way for greater price elasticity.

Are there clubs out there who are successful in attracting and retaining millennial members? What can I learn from them?

Most definitely. We’re witnessing clubs roll out a number of effective initiatives to attract and integrate millennial members.

My advice?

  • Welcome millennials into the governance structure. They want a voice and the overall membership benefits from fresh, younger ideas at the committee level.
  • Encourage them to get involved with events. Some older members may be reluctant at first, but, actually, most will love the injection of youth into events.
  • Find ways to get the family involved, even if you only offer golf. Socialization is key, as is spousal approval. Need some inspiration?
    • Offer periodic child care (for a fee) so couples can enjoy time together at the club
    • Host live music outdoors where young couples can socialize
    • Increase service levels when spouses are on property (call them by name, remember their drink, be ready for them)

Any interesting developments or emerging trends from this year’s findings?

We know that millennials are a time-strapped generation. Between work and family life they don’t have a great deal of time left to dedicate to leisure interests. It’s for that reason, in recent years, we’ve witnessed the convergence of leisure and family, with more and more clubs becoming family-friendly and a place for families to spend time together.

Now, we’re starting to see work come into the equation, which is no great surprise as 74% of respondents stated work commitments prevent them from playing more. Clubs are capitalizing on the trend by creating an environment that makes the transition from work to golf and club easier. This could involve investing in modern business facilities with shared workstations, calling booths and private meeting rooms to accommodate their needs.

As there appears to be no letup in time pressures on this generation, we’d expect to see an increasingly closer union between work, family and leisure time.

 

Is your club in need of a shift in focus to appeal to a wider and younger audience of prospective members?

Connect with Michael Gregory to see how GGA’s expertise and insights
in this area can help your club.

Useful links:

Millennial Golf Industry Survey 2019
The Truth About Millennial Golfers 2018
The Truth About Millennial Golfers 2017

2019 Millennial Golf Industry Survey Findings – Part 7

In ongoing research collaboration with Millennial golfer organization Nextgengolf, GGA recently updated its study of the habits, attitudes, and preferences of Millennial golfers.  The 2019 study brings forward survey findings from over 1,400 Millennial golfers and builds upon research conducted in 2017 and 2018.

This is the seventh installment of a multi-part series of infographics to feature the latest Millennial golfer feedback. Part 7, below, explores the importance of non-golf amenities and social components Millennials look for in club offerings. Also included are observations about how their outlook is evolving over time and several takeaways on how the golf industry is responding to Millennial interests.

See previous installments here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6 and look for the final installment of this series to be released shortly.

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Research Overview

In many clubs today, the long-held expectations and perceptions of existing, ageing members are at odds with the entirely different needs and expectations of a new wave of younger, more casual members.  The challenge for clubs?  To create an environment which not only appeals to the new wave, but where members of all types can coexist.

Research findings highlight how golf clubs can adapt and develop their offerings to meet the needs of the next generation of members and customers.  The goal is to provide valuable insights about Millennial golfers, the challenges they face, and the opportunities for clubs to help support the long-term sustainability of the game and the industry as a whole.

Background

As the leading entity for team-based golf in the United States, Nextgengolf connects Millennials to golf and supports the success of their game while GGA specializes in solution engineering and problem solving for golf-related businesses.  A fusion of GGA’s 27-year history of private club research and Nextgengolf’s connection to young golfers afforded the unique opportunity to study a highly valuable Millennial audience.

The survey sample focused exclusively on a sample audience of active, avid Millennial golfers with prior golf interest and experience in tournaments or golf events.  To date, more than 3,600 survey responses have been analyzed during the three-year research study.

Thank you to the Club Management Association of America (CMAA) for the support that makes this research possible.

2019 Millennial Golf Industry Survey Findings – Part 6

In ongoing research collaboration with Millennial golfer organization Nextgengolf, GGA recently updated its study of the habits, attitudes, and preferences of Millennial golfers.  The 2019 study brings forward survey findings from over 1,400 Millennial golfers and builds upon research conducted in 2017 and 2018.

This is the sixth installment of a multi-part series of infographics to feature the latest Millennial golfer feedback. Part 6, below, examines the tolerance levels of Millennial golfers to pay annual club dues and considers these within the context of what inhibits or triggers them to join private clubs. Also included are some suggestions from Millennials on how clubs can increase the relevance of their dues structures to the Millennial audience.

See previous installments here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5 and look for new installments to be released in the coming weeks.

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Research Overview

In many clubs today, the long-held expectations and perceptions of existing, ageing members are at odds with the entirely different needs and expectations of a new wave of younger, more casual members.  The challenge for clubs?  To create an environment which not only appeals to the new wave, but where members of all types can coexist.

Research findings highlight how golf clubs can adapt and develop their offerings to meet the needs of the next generation of members and customers.  The goal is to provide valuable insights about Millennial golfers, the challenges they face, and the opportunities for clubs to help support the long-term sustainability of the game and the industry as a whole.

Background

As the leading entity for team-based golf in the United States, Nextgengolf connects Millennials to golf and supports the success of their game while GGA specializes in solution engineering and problem solving for golf-related businesses.  A fusion of GGA’s 27-year history of private club research and Nextgengolf’s connection to young golfers afforded the unique opportunity to study a highly valuable Millennial audience.

The survey sample focused exclusively on a sample audience of active, avid Millennial golfers with prior golf interest and experience in tournaments or golf events.  To date, more than 3,600 survey responses have been analyzed during the three-year research study.

Thank you to the Club Management Association of America (CMAA) for the support that makes this research possible.

2019 Millennial Golf Industry Survey Findings – Part 5

In ongoing research collaboration with Millennial golfer organization Nextgengolf, GGA recently updated its study of the habits, attitudes, and preferences of Millennial golfers.  The 2019 study brings forward survey findings from over 1,400 Millennial golfers and builds upon research conducted in 2017 and 2018.

This is the fifth installment of a multi-part series of infographics to feature the latest Millennial golfer feedback. Part 5, below, illustrates the relationship between household income and Millennial golf utilization by considering the factors which prevent them from playing more golf and assessing whether preferences for facilities, amenities, and booking methods are impacted by characteristics such as income or children.

See previous installments here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and look for new installments to be released in the coming weeks.

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Research Overview

In many clubs today, the long-held expectations and perceptions of existing, ageing members are at odds with the entirely different needs and expectations of a new wave of younger, more casual members.  The challenge for clubs?  To create an environment which not only appeals to the new wave, but where members of all types can coexist.

Research findings highlight how golf clubs can adapt and develop their offerings to meet the needs of the next generation of members and customers.  The goal is to provide valuable insights about Millennial golfers, the challenges they face, and the opportunities for clubs to help support the long-term sustainability of the game and the industry as a whole.

Background

As the leading entity for team-based golf in the United States, Nextgengolf connects Millennials to golf and supports the success of their game while GGA specializes in solution engineering and problem solving for golf-related businesses.  A fusion of GGA’s 27-year history of private club research and Nextgengolf’s connection to young golfers afforded the unique opportunity to study a highly valuable Millennial audience.

The survey sample focused exclusively on a sample audience of active, avid Millennial golfers with prior golf interest and experience in tournaments or golf events.  To date, more than 3,600 survey responses have been analyzed during the three-year research study.

Thank you to the Club Management Association of America (CMAA) for the support that makes this research possible.

2019 Millennial Golf Industry Survey Findings – Part 4

In ongoing research collaboration with Millennial golfer organization Nextgengolf, GGA recently updated its study of the habits, attitudes, and preferences of Millennial golfers.  The 2019 study brings forward survey findings from over 1,400 Millennial golfers and builds upon research conducted in 2017 and 2018.

This is the fourth installment of a multi-part series of infographics to feature the latest Millennial golfer feedback. Part 4, below, takes a look at the facility preferences of low-handicap Millennial golfers, their willingness to pay private club fees, and suggests ways clubs can look to attract them as members.

See previous installments here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and look for new installments to be released in the coming weeks.

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Research Overview

In many clubs today, the long-held expectations and perceptions of existing, ageing members are at odds with the entirely different needs and expectations of a new wave of younger, more casual members.  The challenge for clubs?  To create an environment which not only appeals to the new wave, but where members of all types can coexist.

Research findings highlight how golf clubs can adapt and develop their offerings to meet the needs of the next generation of members and customers.  The goal is to provide valuable insights about Millennial golfers, the challenges they face, and the opportunities for clubs to help support the long-term sustainability of the game and the industry as a whole.

Background

As the leading entity for team-based golf in the United States, Nextgengolf connects Millennials to golf and supports the success of their game while GGA specializes in solution engineering and problem solving for golf-related businesses.  A fusion of GGA’s 27-year history of private club research and Nextgengolf’s connection to young golfers afforded the unique opportunity to study a highly valuable Millennial audience.

The survey sample focused exclusively on a sample audience of active, avid Millennial golfers with prior golf interest and experience in tournaments or golf events.  To date, more than 3,600 survey responses have been analyzed during the three-year research study.

Thank you to the Club Management Association of America (CMAA) for the support that makes this research possible.

2019 Millennial Golf Industry Survey Findings – Part 3

In ongoing research collaboration with Millennial golfer organization Nextgengolf, GGA recently updated its study of the habits, attitudes, and preferences of Millennial golfers.  The 2019 study brings forward survey findings from over 1,400 Millennial golfers and builds upon research conducted in 2017 and 2018.

This is the second installment of a multi-part series of infographics to feature the latest Millennial golfer feedback.  Part 1 focused on the demographics of respondents and their exposure to the game.  Part 2 summarized the reasons why Millennials play golf and explored what will trigger them to join a private club. Part 3, below, considers barriers deterring Millennials from joining private clubs and looks at their tolerance to pay annual dues and joining fees.

Keep an eye out for new installments to be released in the coming weeks.

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Research Overview

In many clubs today, the long-held expectations and perceptions of existing, ageing members are at odds with the entirely different needs and expectations of a new wave of younger, more casual members.  The challenge for clubs?  To create an environment which not only appeals to the new wave, but where members of all types can coexist.

Research findings highlight how golf clubs can adapt and develop their offerings to meet the needs of the next generation of members and customers.  The goal is to provide valuable insights about Millennial golfers, the challenges they face, and the opportunities for clubs to help support the long-term sustainability of the game and the industry as a whole.

Background

As the leading entity for team-based golf in the United States, Nextgengolf connects Millennials to golf and supports the success of their game while GGA specializes in solution engineering and problem solving for golf-related businesses.  A fusion of GGA’s 27-year history of private club research and Nextgengolf’s connection to young golfers afforded the unique opportunity to study a highly valuable Millennial audience.

The survey sample focused exclusively on a sample audience of active, avid Millennial golfers with prior golf interest and experience in tournaments or golf events.  To date, more than 3,600 survey responses have been analyzed during the three-year research study.

Thank you to the Club Management Association of America (CMAA) for the support that makes this research possible.

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